Achievements

Publications and achievements submitted by our faculty, staff, and students.

Student Gabriel Goff, Nicholas Kerhoulas, and Lucy Kerhoulas Forestry & Wildland Resources

Presented a talk at the Agricultural Research Institute Annual Meeting in Sacramento, CA: “Conifer encroachment and removal in a northern California woodland: Influences on ecosystem physiology and biodiversity.”

Submitted: February 11, 2020

Faculty Lucy Kerhoulas, Ariel Weisgrau, Emily Hoeft, and Nicholas Kerhoulas Forestry & Wildland Resources

Presented a talk at the Ecological Society of America Conference in Louisville, KY: “Within-crown physiology of tall Picea sitchensis trees.”

Submitted: February 11, 2020

Faculty Harold Zald and Kerry Byrne Forestry & Wildland Resources

Zald (PI) and Byrne (co-PI)‘s awarded $87,100 from USDA McIntire-Stennis for their proposal “Quantification and mitigation of large pine mortality after prescribed burning in a drought altered Sierra Nevada mixed-conifer forest, California, USA.”

Submitted: February 6, 2020

Student Bret McNamara, Jeff Kane, David Greene Forestry & Wildland Resources

Former HSU Wildland Fire Lab graduate student, Bret McNamara (2018) published two research papers from his work on the rare Baker cypress.
One paper entitled “Strong dispersal limitation in postfire regeneration of Baker cypress, a rare serotinous conifer“ was published in the American Journal of Botany and the other paper entitled “Post-fire fuel succession in a rare California, USA closed-cone conifer” was published in Fire Ecology. These two papers were co-authored by Forestry and Wildland Resources faculty members, Jeff Kane and David Greene.

Submitted: December 1, 2019

Student Susan Marshall and Joe Seney Forestry & Wildland Resources

Humboldt State University Wins 2nd place in Region 6 Collegiate Soil Contest, Nov. 2
Five universities sent teams to describe colors, textures, and appropriate uses of soils during the Region 6 Collegiate Soil Competition, hosted by Humboldt State University’s program in Rangeland Resources and Wildland Soils. HSU is among only five universities in California offering sufficient coursework to qualify graduates to become federally recognized Soil Scientists. Participating universities included Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, CSU Chico, CSU Fresno, Humboldt State University, and New Mexico State University. The top three teams (CalPoly San Luis Obispo, Humboldt State University, and New Mexico Stat

Submitted: November 4, 2019

Student Kristin Cooper and Catherine Trimingham Forestry & Wildland Resources

Two Humboldt State University students passed the rigorous “Fundamentals of Soil Science” exam offered on April 15, 2016, becoming Associate Professional Soil Scientists, according to test results from the Council of Soil Science Examiners.

Kristin Cooper and Catherine Trimingham graduated from Humboldt State University with the Wildland Soils option in Rangeland Resource Science. Kristin has performed range technician duties for the Bureau of Land Management in Wyoming and has volunteered for several California Resource Conservation Districts. She is studying for the GRE exam and plans to apply to a graduate program for Fall 2017. Catt rowed for the HSU Women’s Crew team and is currently working as a forest-wide soils technician on the Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forest in Idaho. She says that “my education is much more well-rounded compared to the people I work with. I am able to understand a majority of the timber jargon, identify most of the plants I come in contact with, and have been told that my notes are too thorough.”

The national pass rate for the Spring 2016 soils exam was 56 percent, with a California pass rate of 87.5 percent. Since 2011, 25 HSU students have attempted this exam, with an overall pass rate of 80 percent, the last two years with 100 percent success. Those who pass the fundamentals exam will be eligible to take the Professional Practice exam after five years of professional experience, an additional step in becoming a Certified Professional Soil Scientist. Recent Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) discussions about program self-certification have included the fundamentals exam as one indicator of program quality. Given that the exam is multiple choice, it does not evaluate students’ field skills per se, but is an exam that is offered nationwide and is therefore ‘portable.’ Humboldt State University Wildland Soils students (under the Rangeland Resource Science major) spend more than 200 hours in field or laboratory learning experiences, honing hands-on skills and field judgment of soil properties, limitations, and capabilities.

Submitted: August 19, 2016

Student Andrew Bryant, Matt Prendergast, Andrew Longman, Christina Cortez, Tyler Hanson, Kathleen Dondero, Alicia Goodman, Henry Ayres, and Ariel De Lara Forestry & Wildland Resources

The HSU Range Plant Identification Team competed in the 2015 Society for Range Management plant identification exam located in Sacramento, Calif., in February. The competition involves the sight identification of 200 grasses, forbs, shrubs and trees to species. The HSU Plant Team placed 6th out of 23 schools hailing from Canada, Mexico and United States. The University of Alberta placed first, followed by Texas A&M;, Universidad Autonoma Agraria Antonio Narro, Utah State University, Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua, and HSU, respectively. Advanced Rangeland Plants (RRS 475) prepares students for the annual exam and in preparation for related field work.

Submitted: March 16, 2015

Faculty Andrew P. Stubblefield Forestry & Wildland Resources

Participated in Early Career Scientist Assembly at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder Colorado.
The purpose of the forum was to discuss means of closing the gap between climate change scientists and water resource managers. The goal was to help improve the adaptation of human societies to climate change impacts. Participants cowrote a position paper which will be submitted to the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.

Submitted: August 20, 2010

Faculty Susan Marshall Forestry & Wildland Resources

Professor Susan Marshall, Forestry & Wildland Resources attended the 2016 Society for Range Management Annual Meeting in Corpus Christi, TX. Susan served as 2015 President of the Range Science Education Council and 2016 Past President. She is also an Associate Editor or the Range Ecology & Management Journal and a member of the SRM Professional Accreditation Committee. While there she attended a special workshop looking at the federal Office of Personnel Management 454-Series for Rangeland Specialists with members of the OPM, RSEC and PAC groups. Susan also serves on the Certification Panel for California Certified Range Management specialist.

Submitted: March 4, 2016

Faculty Jeffrey Kane Forestry & Wildland Resources

Assistant forestry professor Jeffrey Kane recently published an article in the journal Oecologia asserting that the number of resin ducts a tree has can help predict how resistant the pine is to beetle infestation. The results of the paper, combined with the findings of an earlier study, provide information that may be useful to land managers who are trying to keep public parks and other relatively small forested areas healthy. In the first study, researchers demonstrated that a certain type of slippery bark protects trees from pine beetle attacks, which can kill trees. For the full article, visit http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00442-013-2841-2/fulltext.html.

Submitted: January 7, 2014

Faculty Kenneth Fulgham Forestry & Wildland Resources

Emeritus Professor Kenneth Fulgham, Forestry & Wildland Resources, attended the 2016 Society for Range Management Annual Meeting in Corpus Christi, TX. Ken recently served a three-year term as a national Director on the SRM Board and has been nominated for the SRM 2nd Vice President position with the election held this fall. Ken is also the SRM Membership Services & Meeting Registration Task Force Chair, plus a member of the SRM Bylaws Revision Task Force.

Submitted: March 4, 2016

Student Travis DiGennaro and Crystal Welch Forestry & Wildland Resources

Rangeland Resources Science majors Travis DiGennaro and Crystal Welch will share the $1,000 Paul Zinke Memorial Scholarship Award for 2013. Travis is an assistant for the introductory soils course, is enrolled in the Wildland Soils option of the range major, and hails from Napa, CA. Crystal Welch is also in the Wildland Soils option and has called Humboldt County and Port Orford, Oregon home. Travis and Crystal will be presenting an undergraduate research poster on actinomycetes found in mushroom compost at the Soil Science Society of America Annual Meetings in Tampa, Florida in November 2013. They join seven past HSU Zinke Award winners: Barbara Witmore (’05), M.S. New Mexico State University, currently employed by the Bureau of Land Management; Rosemary Records (‘06) now in a Ph.D. program at Colorado State University; Sarah Schuette (‘09), co-owner of Dirty Business Consulting of Arcata; Allison Rofe, (‘12) who is a rangeland management specialist for the Natural Resources Conservation Service in Ukiah, CA; Jasmine Westbrook (‘12), currently enrolled in a M.S. program at Montana State University; and Stephanie Winters (‘13), a seasonal employee with BKS Environmental of Gillette, WY.

Submitted: October 1, 2013

Student Mariah Aguiar, Tyler Hanson, Kaelie Pena, Matt Prendergast, Rosa Sanchez, and Deedee Soto Forestry & Wildland Resources

The HSU Range Plant Team recently competed in the 2016 Society for Range Management plant identification exam in Corpus Christi, Texas. The competition involved the identification of 200 grasses, forbs, shrubs and trees. The Plant Team placed 9th out of 23 schools from Canada, Mexico and United States. In addition, HSU students also participating in the Undergraduate Range Management Exam and the Student Booth Display Contest. The students attending these competitions were: Mariah Aguiar, Tyler Hanson, Kaelie Pena, Matt Prendergast, Rosa Sanchez, and Deedee Soto.
Kaelie Pena, Range Management Science major, was elected Secretary to the SRM Student Conclave and she received a summer Pathways Science Technician job with the Forest Service in Bridgeport, California.

Submitted: March 3, 2016

Student Zoe Merrill, Rachelle Dilley, Stephanie Winters, Kyle Garvey, and Braden Pitcher Forestry & Wildland Resources

Five Humboldt State University students passed the rigorous “Fundamentals of Soil Science” exam offered on April 15, 2013, becoming Associate Professional Soil Scientists, according to test results from the Council of Soil Science Examiners. Zoe Merrill, Kyle Garvey and Braden Pitcher graduated with degrees in Wildland Soils in the Rangeland Resource Science major. Stephanie Winters graduated with the Rangeland Resources option and completed sufficient soils courses to be a federal Soil Scientist. Rachelle Dilley graduated with a degree in Botany.

The national pass rate for the spring 2013 exam was 63%. Those who pass the fundamentals exam will be eligible to take the Professional Practice exam after five years of professional experience, an additional step in becoming a Certified Professional Soil Scientist. Recent Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) discussions about program self-certification have included the fundamentals exam as one indicator of program quality. Humboldt State University Wildland Soils students (an option under the Rangeland Resource Science major) spend more than 200 hours in field or laboratory learning experiences, honing hands-on skills and field judgment of soil properties, limitations, and capabilities.

Submitted: August 15, 2013

Faculty Andrew Stubblefield, Rosalea Bond Forestry & Wildland Resources

Andrew P. Stubblefield, Professor of Hydrology and Watershed Management has recently published a paper titled Sensitivity of summer stream temperatures to climate variability and riparian reforestation strategies
in the Journal of Hydrology, Regional Studies. Coauthors were recent M.S. graduate Rosealea M. Bond and faculty emeritus Robert W. Van Kirk.

Submitted: October 23, 2015

Student Forestry students Forestry & Wildland Resources

The Department of Forestry and Wildland Resources presented 22 of its students with nearly $28,000 in scholarships at its 15th annual Spring Awards banquet in April. Three graduating seniors were recognized at the ceremony: Zachary Carter, Academic Excellence Award; Noah Coonen, Professional Promise Award, and Celina Weeg, Most Outstanding Student Award in Rangeland Resources and Wildland Soils. Department Chair Kenneth (K.O.) Fulgham reported that faculty have gained more than $1.37 million in grant research awards in the past 18 months. He recognized retiring Professor John Stuart for his 30 years of service to the department. For the third year running, Stuart was voted “Outstanding Professor of the Year” by the department’s students.

Submitted: April 12, 2013

Faculty Erin Kelly Forestry & Wildland Resources

Assistant Professor Erin Kelly of the Forestry Department is working with researchers at the US Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station to find ways to help forest landowners conduct fuels treatments at large scales and across ownership boundaries to improve fire resilience. Dr. Kelly received $100,000 from the US Forest Service to support the work, which started with documenting known large-scale, cross-boundary fire restoration projects, then choosing case studies across Oregon and Washington. Jodie Pixley, a student in the HSU Environment and Community Master’s program, spent her summer in the Klamath Basin and Ashland, Oregon, working on two case studies.

Submitted: September 10, 2015

Faculty Larry Fox Forestry & Wildland Resources

Emeritus Forestry Professor Larry Fox has completed a volunteer project investigating the death of more than 1500 people fleeing Libya across the Central Mediterranean using geospatial and remote sensing technology. Fox and researchers from the University of London produced a report on a particular case of migrants’ death involving 63 people, where the military and other actors failed to provide assistance to seafarers in distress.

The report was the basis for a legal case against France and may be used to file cases against other countries that participated in the 2011 military intervention in Libya. The full report is available at: http://www.forensic-architecture.org/homepage/fields/investigations/sea. The project was supported by GISCorps, which coordinates short term, volunteer-based GIS services to underprivileged communities.

Submitted: June 15, 2012

Faculty Jeff Kane Forestry & Wildland Resources

Dr. Jeff Kane was invited to give a talk entitled “Ecological insights of litter flammability traits in southeastern US tree species” as part of the Carlton N. Owens lecture series at Mississippi State University.

Submitted: December 10, 2018

Faculty Morgan Varner, Kenneth Fulgham Forestry & Wildland Resources

The Northern California Prescribed Fire Council met in Humboldt County on Nov. 16 and 17. The first day was spent as a field tour looking at prescribed fire use in Redwood National Park for maintaining vegetation structure of grassland and oak woodland ecosystems. The second day was held at River Lodge in Fortuna where Drs. Morgan Varner and Kenneth Fulgham attended. Varner is the Council Chairman and provided the Opening Remarks to about 70 attendees. The mission of the NorCal Prescribed Fire Council is to provide a venue for practitioners, state and federal agencies, academic institutions, tribes, coalitions and interested individuals to work collaboratively to promote, protect, conserve and expand the responsible use of prescribed fire in Northern California’s fire-adapted landscapes. More information can be found at: norcalrxfirecouncil.org and at prescribedfire.net.

Submitted: November 18, 2011